5 Ways to Teach Ethics in the Classroom

Help your students prepare for a professional career. Check out five ways to teach ethics in the classroom.

by Sarah Armstrong
by Sarah Armstrong

It is important that you promote reflection more than simply deliver ready-made answers to what should or should not be done.

Professional ethics can be very different from personal ethics.

Here are some tips on how to teach ethics in the classroom.

It is important that you promote more reflection than simply deliver ready-made responses of what should or should not be done.

According to study at www.essayontime.com.au/assignment-help-in-australia, professional ethics can be very different from personal ethics. For example, if you are a psychology professional and a client confesses to being responsible for a murder, the first thing you would do as an ordinary person would be to hand him over to the police. However, as a psychologist, the code of ethics is different and you follow the principle of confidentiality, that is, what your client told you should not be disclosed. To help your students better understand how these differences work, here are some tips on how to teach ethics in the classroom.

See five ways to teach ethics in the classroom.

1) Relationships.

Professional and personal relationships are very different, especially when dealing with the example given in the previous paragraph, in psychology. What you would do if you discovered something about your friend or your co-worker is very different. Exploring these spheres of relationship with students is very important whether they are in fundamental or higher education.

2) The extremes of a single situation.

It is important that you promote more reflection than simply deliver ready-made responses of what should or should not be done. An example of how to do this is to analyze the extremes of a single situation and how it could be put into real life, everyday life. The extreme of the ethical and the extreme of the wrong can easily be pointed out in radical situations like a murder or the diversion of money in electoral campaigns, however it is important to emphasize the importance of these values ​​in situations lived by the students, like for example, sitting in a favorite seat when older people stand, cut lines, lie on the resume, etc.

3) Test the limits.

Following the suggestion given above, test the boundaries with your students. What would they do if risky situations involved family and friends or what rules would they be willing to break to help and save those people? Help them reflect on the importance and influence of relationships in their ethical decisions and how others, whether close to or not, can be affected by them.

4) Establishing rules.

This activity may seem somewhat monotonous, but if done correctly will provoke debate and much interaction between different points of view. In the context of each classroom, level of education and students, the teacher should think of situations where they can establish a personal rule of conduct. For example, I will never curse or beat another colleague. From that choice, put the rules in evidence. For example, if he is attacked, will he not defend himself? What is the limit of the patience not to explode with the colleague and curse or disrespect the teacher?

5) Change the roles.

by Sarah Armstrong
by Sarah Armstrong

From the rules discussed in the activity above, you can change the roles and ask the students if they would like to live under the rules created by others. For example, if you, as a teacher, think it is not wrong to gossip or talk about students, what would you think as a director, about gossiping about teachers? Do the reversal of roles and try to observe how each feels when one is put in another's shoes.