Wilting Rose

Once it’s all said and done, Derrick Rose’s career will go down as one of the unfortunate to ever unfold in the NBA. Upon entering the league, the University of Memphis product took the association by storm and was well on his way to becoming one of the all-time greats. The speedy rise came to a screeching halt when he tore the ACL in his left knee in a playoff game for the Chicago Bulls in 2012.

The apex of Rose’s career was in 2011, when he became the youngest ever to win the Most Valuable Player award. He played in nearly every contest – missing just one – and averaged 25 points, 7 assists, and 4 rebounds per game. Go ahead and YouTube that season, and you will witness unbelievable plays and highlight dunks. Rose, pre-injury, was a sight to behold, a once in a generation type basketball player.

When Rose injured his left knee, he contracted the injury bug that has seemed to have never gone away. He missed the entire 2012-2013 season to recover and rehab, and the following year, in 2014, tore the meniscus in his right knee and missed 72 games. In 2015, he tore the same meniscus again and missed 32 games. Rose, in his nine-year career, has never played a full season’s 82 games.

The wilting Rose, as a result, has bounced around the league and is now a bonafide journeyman. After spending the first seven seasons of his career with the Bulls, Rose has played for the New York Knicks, the Cleveland Cavaliers, and now, as reported by Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN, the Minnesota Timberwolves:

Rose will be reunited with head coach Tom Thibodeau, whom he enjoyed his most productive seasons with in the league. It remains to be seen how the pairing will work this time around, as Rose is a shell of himself, and Thibodeau already has proven stars in Karl Anthony-Towns and Jimmy Butler to rely upon.

Minnesota could very well be the last stop for Rose, who is literally and figuratively on his last legs. So dependent on his explosiveness and quickness for much of his career, Rose has not developed an “old man’s game”. With his diminishing physical abilities and career 29 percent three-point percentage, it will be interesting to see Rose’s role with the Timberwolves.

The former Rookie of the Year, All-Star, and MVP was once the face of the NBA. He was on top of the world and had the league in the palm of his hands. Unfortunately for Rose, the Bulls, the city of Chicago, and basketball fans from all over, it did not last long enough.